Law

law gavel

Mission Statement

Studying Law will:

  • develop skills of selection, analysis, critical thinking and decision making
  • encourage an awareness of the rights and responsibilities of individuals
  • provide a broad knowledge base for students wanting to study A Level Law or Law at university
  • equip students with skills and knowledge for other fields of study and work

Law at GCSE  was introduced in September 2013. We will follow the AQA syllabus and students  sit two exam papers in June.

Paper 1: The English Legal System: Introduction to Law; Courts and Processes; People in the Law; Sources of English Law
Paper 2: Law in Action: The Law of Tort; Criminal Law; Family Law; Rights and Responsibilities

A/S and A level follow the WJEC syllabus, with examinations being taken at the end of each academic year.

The specification is divided into a total of 4 units, 2 AS units and 2 A2 units. Weightings noted below are expressed in terms of the full A Level qualification.

AS
Unit One: Understanding Legal Values, Structures and Processes25% 1½ hours 50 marks
Candidates answer two essay questions from a choice of six.Unit Two: Understanding Legal Reasoning, Personnel and Methods
25% 1½ hours 50 marks
Candidates answer two out of four stimulus response questions 
A2 (The above plus the following A2 Units)Unit 3: Understanding Substantive Law: Freedom, the State and the
Individual20% 1½ hours 50 marks
Candidates answer two problem questions from a choice of four from
the following option:
Criminal Law and JusticeUnit Four: Understanding Law in Context: Freedom, the State and the
Individual

30% 2½ hours 75 marks
Candidates answer two out of four questions in Section A and one stimulus
response question from a choice of two in Section B from  the following

option: Criminal Law and Justice

Curriculum

Key Stage 4

GCSE Law Plan September to June
Term 1
Pre Trial
Outline understanding of:

  • The difference between summons and arrest
  • The role of the crown prosecution service
  • The role of duty solicitors
  • What is bail?
  • Conditions of bail

The Trial/Post Trial

  • Role of magistrates courts in trial process
  • Summary trials
  • Either way offences
  • Outline and understanding of sentencing and appeals

Term 2

The Crown Court

  • The trial-understand roles of the judge and jury in trying indictable offences
  • Triable either way offences

Post Trial

  • Outline and understanding of sentencing
  • Understanding of appeals process post trial

Key Stage 5

Post-16 AS Law  Plan  September to  March; Revision – April/May

First Half Term Unit 1:

Week Beginning                Subjects/Theme
8/9           Introduction-civil and criminal law- legal classifications-terminology, sources of law.

15/9         Common Law and Equity-the historical development of English law and Equity, equitable remedies, modern developments in equity.

22/9         Law and morality-principles of UK constitution- separation of powers/ Parliamentary  Sovereignty, distinguish law and morals, Hart/Devlin debate, Warnock Committee. The rule of law.

29/9         The legislative process, concept of parliamentary sovereignty, the legislative process.

6/10         European Union Law: development of European Union; law making roles of EU institutions.

13/10      Student voice exercise
The Criminal Process and Criminal Courts: jurisdiction, summary offences -structure of the criminal courts, work of the courts, offences triable either way, indictable offences.

20/10     The Criminal Process and Criminal Courts:
Miscarriages of justice, work of the Criminal Cases Review Committee, Review of Criminal Process/Courts-creation and work of the Crown Prosecution Service-criteria for deciding whether to continuing prosecution, plea bargaining and the CPS Glidewell Report.

A2
Unit 3: Understanding Substantive Law: Freedom, the State and the
Individual

Option2
Criminal Law and Justice
Unit Four: Understanding Law in Context: Freedom, the State and the
Individual

Option2
Criminal Law and Justice

LA3
Criminal Law and Justice
Content

  • Factors which may Negate Criminal Liability
  • Elements of Substantive Criminal Law
  • Police Powers, Admissibility of Evidence, Remedies for Breach of Police
  • Powers
  • Amplification
  • Factors which may negate Criminal Liability
  • Intoxication by alcohol and other drugs; provocation, diminished responsibility
  • Mistake; self-defence; duress by threat; duress of circumstances; necessity
  • Automatism; consent; insanity
  • Elements of Substantive Criminal La.
  • Homicide; murder, manslaughter. Non-fatal offences against the person excluding
  • Sexual offences
  • Police Powers: Admissibility of Evidence, Remedies for Breach of Police
  • Powers
  • Discretionary nature of police powers. Powers to stop and search persons, vehicles,
  • Property and premises. Powers of arrest, detention and interrogation; powers
  • Relating to terrorism; rights of persons in police custody
  • Treatment of persons during detention, including role of custody officer. Admissibility of evidence.
  • Remedies for breach of police powers, including police complaints procedures
LA4
Criminal Law and Justice
Content

  • Principles of Criminal law and Justice.
  • Factors which may Negate Criminal Liability.
  • Prosecution and Criminal Trial Processes.
  • Sentencing.
  • Amplification.
  • Principles of Criminal law and Justice.
  • Definition of crime; elements of crime; mens rea, actus reus; strict liability.
  • General defences; burden and means of proof. Codification of criminal law. #
  • The effect of the European Convention on Human Rights and the Human Rights Act 1998.
  • Factors which may negate Criminal Liability.
  • Intoxication by alcohol and other drugs; provocation, diminished responsibility, mistake; self-defence; duress by threat; duress of circumstances; necessity.
  • Automatism; consent; insanity.

GCE AS/A LAW 17

  • Prosecution and Criminal Trial Processes.
  • Police discretion in the decision to prosecute, including the use of police cautions.
  • Functions of the Crown Prosecution Service, including outline of the roles of the Attorney-General and the Director of Public Prosecutions.
  • Bail and remand in custody. The trial process, including youth justice.
  • Sentencing and the role of the courts.
  • General principles of sentencing of adults and youths under appropriate legislation.
  • Theories and objectives of sentencing. Empirical data relating to sentencing.
  • Powers of the Magistrates’ Courts and Crown Court. Court of Appeal guidelines.

Learning Resources

The English Legal System-Elliot and Quinn

WJEC A/S Revision Guide, Davies

A/S Revision Guide (internally produced)

A/S notes-in Student Share

Further Research Sites :-

www.wjec- extremely useful for marking schemes/past papers/examiners’ reports

The following are very useful for providing summaries/revision
www.sixthformlaw.info
www.helpwithlawexams.co.uk
www.tutor2u.net/law
Miss Hart’s law blog

In addition – general websites for the following are good for news articles and recent developments; BBC, The Guardian, The Independent, The Daily Telegraph, The Times
– see specific websites for certain topics include those for: ACAS, CPS, Home Office, Parliament, Ministry of Justice

Key Successes

Traditionally Post-16 Law students have been very successful, when measured both against their target grades and other studies, and in numerous instances have gone on to study the subject at university.

In 2012, for example, all seven A level students achieved a pass grade, with three gaining a grade C.

Similarly, at A/S, a third of students secured grade C or above, a performance that many of them improved in the winter examinations in January. Almost half of the group, eight students, achieved their best or equal best grade in Law (three and five respectively).

Currently five of nine A/S students have exceeded their target grades by at least one in the latest January examination, two of whom exceeded by two grades, in achieving grades C and B respectively.

Year 13 A2 students were equally impressive in improving their grades, one achieving an A at A/S, another two achieving B s whilst a further student raising his grade from a U to an A in the same session.

 

Meet the Staff

  • Mrs K. Juss
  • Dr K. Dowd

Last updated: January 2014